"We shape our tools
and thereafter our tools shape us.”
--Marshall McLuhan

Video: The Beginning that Changed Everything.

Computer Pioneers: Legends Sadly Forgotten.
They offer so much to the future.

The Fabulous Moore School Lectures of 1946:
America's first "Silicon Valley" awakens.

Feature:
HOW THE PAST INFORMS THE FUTURE

Why selective breeding of ideas doesn't work.

Feature:
INNOVATION HOLLYWOOD STYLE

Engineers & Scientists on the Big Screen





Tribute to Metropolis 1927-2012
FREE 2012 CALENDAR DOWNLOAD

 


 

The party is over but the pulse beats stronger than ever. In 2011, MIT honored its 150 years of ideas, innovations and inventions. The party was so good, we decided to keep some goodies around for a while...as well as our retro-glimpse back at MIT in 1961. MIT

THE LEGENDS SPEAK: Jay & Bob at MIT

COMMENT: Daring Young Men and their Computing Machines

COMMENT: Human Made: The Transformative Force of Creativity.

COMMENT: Creativity and the Technical Mind

COMMENT: WhoMadeStuffWork?

The IEEE Annals of the History of Computing reviews Bright Boys
(July-September 2011)

 

FIRST-EVER GROUP RECOGNITION FOR BRIGHT BOYS
"Sixty-five years after they first drew up the plans"
1947-2012: That's a long time!

Some teenage skateboarding clubs have received more recognition for their deeds than the bright boys, by a long shot. For a group that near singlehandedly delivered up Information Technology for us, such lack of appreciation is hard to fathom. But, that’s one of the reasons why I wrote Bright Boys; that and maybe too, I sought to pass a bit of their luster along to receptive readers out of my own respect for their accomplishments.

It takes only a quick Red Line subway trip across the Charles River to the Kendall Square station to see a vivid example of how marginalized the group has become. Upstairs from the station is the Barta Building where they first tossed some lightning bolts around.

Before writing the book, a short time after my research on it was complete or nearly so, as well as a finished monograph, I took a pilgrimage to the Barta Building. My first visit. I was hoping for a jolt of inspiration before writing. I took the Red Line, and a single-use, throw-away camera to memorialize the trip.

As the subway door opened, there laid out along the station wall in neat rows of tiles from floor to ceiling was the history of MIT: from William Barton Rogers straight through to the new millennium. It appeared all inclusive—until one gets to the mid-1940s, 1945 to be exact.

One large tile commemorated the glories of MIT’s famous RadLab (Radiation Laboratory), which mustered out of its wartime service in late 1945. Then came a half inch of grout. The next tile hailed the 1946 beginning and subsequent excellent successes of the Research Laboratory of Electronics (RLE). But where were the deeds of the Barta Building 1948 to 1953 recorded? There was a missing tile that should have been set between the RadLab and RLE? Nowhere to be found. Could it be the grout?

Things soon got stranger. More>>>


 

 

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